POTD: Palette Spring

Palette Spring
Yellowstone National Park
2011

One of my favorite thermal features on the terrace at the Mammoth Hot Springs. The lighting in this one reminds me of the ethereal lighting you see in some of Bierstadt’s paintings.

A couple of folks commented that the Bob Dylan music from a recent post keeps playing automatically whenever they open the POTD page. That is odd since the html code for the embedded video had the auto play feature set to off. Still, music that plays automatically is one of my pet peeves about web sites, so I took the video off the page. I’ll also quit using videos from Metacafe (the source of the Dylan video) and stick with Youtube videos which never seem to have that problem. My apologies to anyone else who also experienced an overdose of Subterranean Homesick Blues.

POTD: Road Guard

Road Guard
Yellowstone National Park
2011

This guy was trotting along the road like he owned the place. It wasn’t until I took a close look at the photo that I noticed he was wearing a collar–probably a radio transmitter. Is it just me, or does collaring and keeping track of a wild animal make that animal less wild?

POTD: Buffalo Bill

Buffalo Bill
Yellowstone National Park
2011

One nice thing about photographing wildlife from a car (other than the obvious appeal to the terminally lazy) is that you can be a lot closer with considerably more safety than being outside the car. Not to say that your car isn’t at some risk–but better it’s exterior rather than your own receiving some cosmetic rearrangement.

POTD: Roadblock

Roadblock
Yellowstone National Park
2011

We’re in Yellowstone National Park this weekend, roughing it at Mammoth Hot Springs where we have to leave the hotel and walk all the way across the street to the bar to get internet access. At least the animals are more accommodating, walking right up to the car so you don’t even have to get out or use a telephoto lens to get a good picture. Once this guy got out of my way I did go skiing, but strangely enough,while there were scads of big game on or near the road on the way to and from the trail head, I saw none while actually out skiing.

POTD: The Lighthouse Keeper’s Wife

The Lighthouse Keeper’s Wife
Pt. Reyes, California
2011

I found myself wandering back to the Pt. Reyes photos and found this additional lighthouse image I like. That’s a hooded young woman in the lower left corner. I didn’t really want her in the photo but since she made it in there anyway, I decided to work her into a fictitious role in the title. Back in the days when this lighthouse was a very remote location, it must have taken a special personality type for the operators to be able to enjoy, tolerate, or suffer through (as the case may be) long stretches of isolation. I enjoy isolation, but only in smallish bits, then I require more stimulation.  So, positioned at a remote lighthouse, I’d likely find myself spending a lot of time doing just what I imagine this young woman to be doing; watching the ships pass by out off the coast, wondering where they were bound and wishing to be on board.

(In the interest of political correctness, I should point out that the title assumes the young woman is the lighthouse keeper’s wife rather than a female lighthouse keepers because, back in the day, the lighthouse keepers were almost always men.)

POTD: The Gesture (Contemplation #2)

The Gesture (Contemplation #2)
Sacramento, California
2011

There’s a strange (from a logical point of view) idiom out there about the exception that proves the rule. Here’s a statue of a male figure that proves the rule I proposed yesterday about cemetery sculptures being predominately female subjects.

POTD: The Gesture (Resignation)

The Gesture (Resignation)
Sacramento, California
2011

This statue is in the old city cemetery in Sacramento. I wonder if it is a copy of some famous sculpture as there were at least two similar statues in this cemetery and I’ve seen it in other places as well. It’s interesting that cemetery statues almost always depict women rather than men. I guess the prevailing thought is that real men don’t mourn.

POTD: Taqueria

Taqueria
Sacramento, California
2011

Some more spotlighting, this time on K Street in downtown Sacramento. For being a stone’s throw from the capitol building, I was surprised how much the business community in this area of downtown seemed to be struggling. I guess the empty storefronts and marginal businesses are symbolic of the condition of the statewide economy these days.